AAA Announces New Vehicle Technology Trends for 2012 Read more here

To see the full article click this link from Bradenton.com

Here are some high points of the article, and if you are interested we have now in Israel Mobile Eye which is a “lane departure warning system add on” contact us for pricing.

Brake Assist- This feature, now standard equipment in some vehicles, recognizes when a driver has just instituted an emergency stop. The system then applies full braking power, even if the driver has not pressed the brake pedal hard enough to do this. If the driver backs off the brakes, the system steps out of the picture. This feature was first offered in some vehicles in the mid-90s after studies showed that even experienced drivers were reluctant to use all the braking power built into their vehicles during an emergency.

Parking Proximity Warning Systems and Backup Cameras- These features let a driver know when he or she is getting close to an object and/or show the path the car is taking. Using sensors, the warning system identifies items, animals or people, including small children that the driver cannot see because his or her view is blocked by parts of the vehicle. The backup camera shows the area directly behind the vehicle when in reverse. Originally a luxury car exclusive, today parking sensors and back up cameras are far more common, even on popularly priced vehicles.

Lane Departure Warning Systems- A safety feature that lets a driver know they have begun to cross over lane markers without signaling, lane departure warning systems use cameras to sense the lane markings on pavement. It will issue a warning that can be audible or take the form of a vibration in the steering wheel. Originally offered on top Infiniti models, today, lane departure warning systems are more widely available.

Active Cruise Control– This feature, once a luxury car exclusive, uses radar or laser to maintain a set distance from the car ahead. If a driver using such a system encounters slower traffic, the cruise control will automatically reduce speed by backing off the throttle. If the traffic clears or speeds up, the active cruise control will return to the driver’s original speed. Newer systems can also apply the brakes when needed to maintain a safe following distance. In some cases the active cruise control system will actually bring the car to a stop if the traffic ahead stops. Active cruise control is now offered as an option on a wide range of vehicles, including those that cost less than $30,000.

Stop-Start- Stop-start is a feature that is well known to any hybrid vehicle owner and drivers in Europe. This technology automatically stops the gasoline engine while the driver waits for a red light to turn green. It saves fuel while reducing emissions. Kia may soon bring this technology to non-hybrid applications in two of their low-priced cars, the Soul and Rio.  Expect expanded use of this technology in the next few years as vehicle manufacturers’ work to meet the higher Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards set for 2016.   Driver Alert Warning System– Driver alert warning systems, originally introduced on costly luxury models, looks for signs of an inattentive or tired driver.  There are several ways to monitor the alertness or attention of a driver that range from lane departure to monitoring the driver’s movements via cameras.  Despite differences in monitoring technology, when the vehicle senses drowsiness or inattention it warns the driver to take a break.

Blind Spot Warning Systems– This warning system uses a radar or camera to detect and warn a driver that another vehicle is lurking just out of view in an adjacent lane. Often, an amber light on the appropriate mirror is illuminated when a vehicle is in the driver’s blind spot. If the driver signals to move in that direction, an audible alert or flashing light is activated as a warning. First seen in costly vehicles, it is now standard equipment is some family vehicles, including several Mazda models.